RW Spryszak- Author Interview (2018)

I am so pleased and honored to introduce you great readers to an astounding writer by the name of RW Spryszak. I have a few interviews under my belt but have never felt like I was reading literature when reading answers. Mr. Spryszak has done that for me here. So eloquent and illuminating that they are a joy to read, I hope that you will enjoy them as much as I did. His book Edju was very hard for me to put down. So without further ado, please enjoy and here is a small bio to get you started.

Bio- RW Spryszak’s recent work has appeared in Peculiar Mormyrid, A-Minor Magazine, and Novelty (UK), among others. His early work is archived in the John M Bennett Avant Writing Collection at the Ohio State University Libraries. He is editor at Thrice Fiction Magazine* and recently produced “I Wagered Deep On The Run Of Six Rats To See Which Would Catch The First Fire*,” a collection of contemporary surrealist and outsider writing from around the world for 2018 under that banner, which is also available on Amazon.


Who are some of your favorite authors, or authors that have inspired you?

What inspires me to work is work that isn’t produced. I go into a bookstore just to browse and leave without buying anything. You could ask my wife this. She would verify what I’m saying. This happens a lot. And a long time ago I asked myself, well, what did you want to find that you couldn’t find? And maybe that is what you should write. Write what you’d like to read but can’t find. This is how I work. So, it isn’t what authors have written that inspires me, as you say, it’s what they haven’t written. It’s only a void I’m filling. In my own universe anyway.

Now, as an example of writers whose work has influenced me I have to go back to when I was young and didn’t know what I liked but found things that stayed with me. Gogol’s Dead Souls, first of all. I still have that old worn Penguin Classic copy from when I was in high school. The pages are quite yellow now. Of course, everybody who is a reader discovered Kafka as a teenager I think. But it was people who wrote things that made me go – “You can do this??” I mean when you’re young or naïve you expect a story to go from A to B to C, and twists and unexpected things make your head snap. So, there are the poems of Dylan Thomas and Guillaume Apollinaire. Thomas creates these spiraling images and ideas that blend and weave in and out of each other until you find yourself trapped in his crazy tornado. And Apollinaire writes the kind of things that make you say – “you can do that??” His work is one hundred years old and a lot of it reads like it was done yesterday.

But there’s Robert Walser. Naguib Mahfouz. Jan Potocki. I’m saying these names but I’m quite sure no one is going to look them up or anything. Still, I don’t think – for your audience – you can call yourself a true fan of horror if you haven’t read Potocki’s A Manuscript Found in Saragossa. Just saying. Maybe kitsch horror, but not gothic horror. Dracula, Frankenstein, certainly. But if you haven’t read Manuscript you have a missing part in there. An aspect that would make you say – “you can do that??”

When did you start writing, or what prompted you to start writing?

So how do I answer your question? I don’t know. I used to make up stories in my head as a little boy. Full technicolor epics before I would fall asleep. Wash up. Brush teeth. Go to bed. Roll around making up movies in my head.

And my first rejection letter came from Stan Lee. I wrote a story that pitted Doctor Strange against The Hulk. I was 10 years old. I sent it in and, with the innocent expectations of a kid I also sent along 12 cents to buy the issue my story would appear in. Well, of course, Marvel Comics would never use a hand-written story from a 10-year-old who didn’t know the highway from a footpath. So, here’s my Stan Lee story. 1963 or 4. I got a hand written note back from Stan Lee saying he enjoyed the story but could only use their own material. And – get this – the 12 cents I included with my submission was taped to the blue card he sent back with his note in an envelope. Was he the coolest guy ever? Yes, he was. By the way, Doctor Strange did face The Hulk in one adventure eventually, I think, sometime in the 1990’s I believe. I ought to sue, don’t you think?

How would you describe your style of writing?

I don’t think I think like a writer. I’m influenced by the visual. I look at things like a painter or a sculptor but I couldn’t paint or sculpt to save my skin so I write the form. Writing and acting were always easier than painting. Concepts. Visuals. I think probably because I was influenced by TV and movies when I was small. In Edju, in particular, I used something I learned from my long-ago acting days. How to stay in character from start to finish. Edju is a first-person story, so it’s vital you don’t “break character,” as actors would say.

Though I’m not in the Surrealist camp, so to speak, and never claimed to be, I do use the techniques they’ve developed. They try to bring the unconscious truth to things and so Arp’s ideas about Chance often come into play. Then there’s the process of automatic writing or even sentence collage. These are things I’ll utilize. Take for example in Edju, I used automatic writing as prompts. The start of some chapters is in italics. That was straight from the back of the brain and unedited automatic writing. Then I connected them. I left the strictly Surrealist process when I connected these prompts with a willful, consciously-produced narrative – which makes me not a Surrealist, I think. I don’t know. You’d have to ask them if I’m one of them or not. I mean, several Surrealists, people who have been with that worldview for decades, have supported my work – Max Cafard, J. Karl Bogartte, the New York Surrealist group – but I think that’s because I love the work they produce and have spoken up for their movement – which never went away, contrary to what the New Yorker may think – for years.

42192222 (1)

And, really, I think this is a question better asked of my readers than of me. There are people who like my style and people who can’t stand it. Folks who tell me they can’t put it down and folks who can’t get through the first two pages without screaming and burning the damn thing. I know my stuff is difficult sometimes. So, what do I say?

Do you set a certain plot, or go where your writing takes you?

I could never work from an outline. I tried when I was younger. I couldn’t do it. It was like – I’ve written the outline and so the book is done, right? I have nothing but a vague idea and I’ve never known how things were going to end. Not ever. In Edju, I was going along and going along and wrote If I didn’t need to eat I would never trust your world again, and I would stay in these rooms till the spiders wept.” And I stopped and looked at it and said – Okay. That’s the last line. I’m done, now for the edits. And that line will lead into the first line of the next book because Edju, conceptually, is a trilogy. I have two vague notions about the two next pieces but I have no idea where they are going to go. The second book has been started at least five times and I think I only just settled on what to do last week. So, I guess my answer is I go where it takes me after a vague notion, or something like that.

If, while writing, I can’t visualize a title for the thing? I know I’m onto something. Whenever I’ve had a title first, nothing ever works. I don’t understand that. When I get to the point where I can’t come up with a title no matter what and it comes down to I don’t even care what anybody wants to call it, just get it away from me, you decide – it gets published. When I start with a title, it never even gets finished. It’s weird.

What are some of your favorite works of literature?

Well, yes, I mentioned these. Dead Souls, The Manuscript Found in Saragossa. Mahfouz’s The Journey of ibn Fattouma. Walser’s Jakob Von Gunten. But also, from a writer’s viewpoint, there’s technical aspect too, that you have to have. I’m not a big fan, but even if you don’t like him you have to say that Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea is the perfectly executed novella. And it’s good to have a grounding. In fact, I’ve always felt you need a grounding in the classical and traditional before you can go off “experimenting.” You’ll find Picasso’s early stuff more traditional than you’d at first think it would be, being Picasso. Then, when he “got it,” so to speak, he created his own world and his own rules. But I’d say he couldn’t do it until he understood the starting point. I think that’s true for everyone to some degree. So, until you can read Dickens and explain why he’s a lousy writer, and he is, you should keep reading the traditional until you “get it.”

What is the most important aspect of writing for you?

Well it’s a compulsion that has to be fulfilled, isn’t it? When I was in my twenties I used to worry about getting published. Have to get published. It must happen. And so on. Of course, that’s when nothing ever happened. It wasn’t until I finally said, you know what, it doesn’t really matter if it gets published or not because I’m going to sit here and write anyway because I have to or I’ll just explode or go crazy. I would write because it was going to happen whether anybody was ever going to read it or not. That, of course, is when people started to accept and publish things.

Oddly enough, after that, I got this crazy notion that I wanted to bust into the mainstream. I had all this alternative work done and it was archived and I had a tribe and – for some reason – I said I’m going to try to break into the big time or something and – poof. Came the drought. I wanted to get published. I needed to get published. And nobody wanted anything I was doing. A couple of the bigger wigs even laughed at it. Because it was actually pathetic stuff, to be honest. So, okay, I went back to just doing what I’d always done and forgot about “trying” so hard and… what do you think? All of a sudden (to use a term that should never appear in anything you ever write), there I was back in print.

That’s the long way around the barn to say the most important aspect of writing, for me, is to not only be yourself, but if it’s working there’s nothing that needs to be fixed. If it ain’t broke. Stay true to your own voice, no matter how trite that may sound. Find your tribe and dance with them.

Do you put any of yourself in your writing?

Yes. There are dozens of things that happened to me, mostly filtered by metaphor, in Edju. Shards of dreams I had. People I’ve met. Or aspects of them. There’s even a scene in the book that I wrote forty years ago for something else. Something I wrote, never kept, but never forgot. It goes on for pages as if I was copying out of an old notebook. I never forgot the scene and it just came into the book on its own. That scene came from a particularly intense part of my growth as a writer. But, yes, they are all over the place. However, well-disguised. And this is all I will say about that.

What led you to write in this genre?

This is crazy because I didn’t write Edju to a genre. I just thought – a book. Maybe Literary Fiction. Maybe Dystopian. I didn’t have a target. When Spuyten Duyvil*, the publisher, first put it on Amazon they listed it as “Gothic.” To be honest, I didn’t even know what Gothic was. Gothic Horror – sure. I’d heard of that. And I didn’t know if there was a difference. Then a few people contacted me and said “Horror,” or “Speculative.” To tell you the truth, I don’t know what it is, exactly. So, my approach is like that old song – “any world that I’m welcomed to.” I’m becoming convinced it belongs in that Gothic category that the publisher listed it in. But you’ll have to believe me when I tell you I seriously didn’t have any kind of thing like genre in my head.

Do any movies or TV shows influence your writing?

Not off hand, no. I don’t watch a lot of TV anymore. My TV is mostly old movies and Baseball. Baseball is my escape hatch. Outside of that it’s just all noise. I suppose, growing up in the late 50s and 60s there were influences that happened then, but I couldn’t specifically tell you one thing or another.

Any future writing projects you would like to talk about?

The plan is to complete a trilogy with Edju as the lead before I croak. I have no idea what to call it, and that’s a good sign I think. But – you shouldn’t take anything for granted. I’m doing this but there’s no guarantee anyone will take it. Life in the small press universe is like that and you have to expect it. Unless you’re a best-seller you don’t make much money in writing. All the writers I know have a regular job somehow. Teaching, editing, or anything. Every one of them. You have to stay real.

I want to thank RW Spryszak so much for his valuable time and marvelous answers to my questions. For more information or to read his works please check out the following links:

Edju is at https://www.amazon.com/Edju-RW-Spryszak/dp/1947980890

*Spuyten Duyvil is at http://www.spuytenduyvil.net/

* “I Wagered Deep, etc.” is at  https://www.amazon.com/Wagered-Which-Would-Catch-First/dp/1945334045

*Thrice Fiction Magazine is at http://www.thricefiction.com/

http://www.rwspryszak.com/



Advertisements

Villainous Monologue

I always seem evil when I tell you my plan

I go on ad nauseum  explaining who I am

To try to expound or maybe to trick

I give details up but never too quick

I lie, I deceive, I do dastardly deeds

Maybe not giving it away is what I most need

But I brag, and I bluster, and sometimes I gloat

For your weakness, and fear just make me emote

Your running offends me and try as I might

I can’t stop getting off on all of your fright

Some call me a malefactor, some call me a cad

You can cry all you want but I’ll always be bad

But outlaw or miscreant no matter the name

You’re always caught up in my winning game

So my monologue is done, run away if you want

I’m just wicked and cruel, and this I will flaunt

Villain I am and of this I am proud

Especially when you’re screams are always so loud

So goodnight little victims, hold onto your heads

Fore I am the scary thing underneath your little beds

Poem 11/10/2018

Susan Leighton: Interviewing the Interviewer! (2018)

Writer, interviewer, podcaster, Susan Leighton does it all. It has been my distinct pleasure to have been speaking with Susan on Twitter for quite awhile now and she is so genuine and extremely entertaining and just a pleasure to speak with. I have read so many of her amazing articles and interviews that I thought it would be fun to interview the interviewer. So lets get to it!

Do you even sleep you have so much going on? 😉

~LOL. Yes, I do. I just keep weird hours for now because it is the nature of the beast. Since I am not a “brand” name I have to hustle to get my work out there. Plus, I am branching out of the niche world and going full throttle into pop culture. I have always been an entertainment person so I am fortunate to have different venues that want to hear what I have to say.

Why horror? And how did you get into it?

~From a child on, I have always been intrigued with realms that are beyond our current frame of reference. I wanted to be an astronaut so I studied the planets which fostered an interest in the concept of other worlds. The paranormal, science-fiction, horror, these are genres that I have always loved. However, that being said, I am more of a pop culture person. While I am predominantly known for what I have done at 1428 Elm, I am now writing for sites that fuel my other passions like Heroic Hollywood and TV Series Hub. I can also be found every Friday night espousing or ranting depending on the topic at Nerdrotic Podcast with Gary Buechler and Dennis Bithoulkas. I have started my own podcast with my buddy, Abby Fagan called Unrestricted Content. I try to keep my options open and also, I love challenges. Anything that is going to push me, I am going to want to try.

What are some of your favorite horror films and books?

~Wow. Where to begin. I got my first taste at a young age when my Mom introduced me to Vincent Price in The Oblong Box. From there, Psycho, The Shining, The Dead Zone, Bubba Ho-Tep….oh, yeah and this thing called Evil Dead. And the book Duma Key by Stephen King.

What are some of the best things to do on Halloween?

~Turn the lights down, throw on a decent horror flick or psychological thriller, grab some popcorn and a Patron martini. And if you’re in the mood, maybe a costume. You know, for later.

cdjh9uFT

How did you get involved with covering Bruce Campbell?

~Man. You are asking the tough questions, Jaye. I asked my editors at 1428 Elm if I could write a little something up for Bubba Ho-Tep’s 15th anniversary. I didn’t know if they would be into it. They were very enthusiastic. In the meantime, we created an Ash Wednesday thing plus I was on the Ash vs Evil Dead season 3 beat which turned into something else entirely. I knew he had a book coming out (Hail to the Chin) so I decided that I was going to interview him. No one had tried it before at the site and I thought what the hell? He is a hard cat to track down but I gave it my best shot, he responded and my first chat went live in September of last year.

Have you met him? Any fun stories?

~Yes, I have met Bruce on several occasions. In February, we sat down for an on-camera interview and then for a print interview during the PR party for Ash vs Evil Dead S3. My last time conversing with him was at HorrorHound Weekend in Indianapolis. As for fun stories, none of them involve him but more about me and logistics, bad makeup and comedy of errors. Part of those experiences will be in a book I am writing. Fiction, of course.

What are some of your favorite tequilas and any suggestions of pairings with horror films?

~I am strictly silver tequila although I have had my share of Anejo and Mezcal in the past. Yes, I have had the worm and nothing trippy came out of it. As for drinks, I love Patron Martinis and Espresso Martinis with Patron. I think if you are going that route, then by all means reach back into the past and grab Rosemary’s Baby, The Tenant or the Exorcist.

Any great horror festival stories?

~Well, up until now, I was a con virgin. Since HorrorHound Weekend, I am no longer one. Let me just tell you, logistics are a bear. The festival was held in a terrific venue in downtown Indy which I remember from 15 years ago when I attended a business conference. However, the panel discussion room felt like it was a secret passageway and I could never quite get there. On Friday, which was the very first day of the con, I was at the hotel bar kicking back with a few friends and some drinks. Panel time for Evil Dead 2 rolled around so I split. Even though I had a map, I kept pulling a European Vacation thing with this policeman. Me: Hey, Officer. Insert laughter. Officer: Didn’t I just see you? Me: Yep. Officer: Evil Dead, right? Yeah, it was that kind of night. I did manage to find the room though.

-BCJ0Gnb

Any favorite interviews?

~Joe Lansdale was a proud moment for me. I have always enjoyed his writing. Dee Wallace was another coup that I was happy to score since she is in the pantheon of scream queens. Dana DeLorenzo, Lindsay Farris, Ray Santiago and Arielle Carver-O’Neill were the best. I had so much fun chatting with them. Oh, and one more. Damn it. I wish I could remember his name. 😉

Do you have a personal mantra?

~Keep it classy or I’ll sleep when I’m dead.

I wanna thank Susan for taking the time to speak with us and say what fun it was, such great answers! If you want to learn more about Susan you can find her at:

https://www.facebook.com/SusanontheLedge/

https://1428elm.com/  for horror genre news and commentary

And on Twitter @SusanontheLedge

Also @heroichollywood  @tvserieshub  @content_podcast @Nerdrotics

Doctor Orange (2018) Horror Comic

I ran across this in development new horror comic Doctor Orange and it looked so awesome I asked the man in charge Joseph Duis at @heresystudiosll   to tell us a little about it!

DOCTOR ORANGE Psychological Horror Comic on KICKSTARTER

Doctor Orange Will See You Now

What would you do if you knew you had hallucinations but you didn’t know when they were affecting you?

That is the problem of Suhaila, the protagonist of the upcoming self-contained psychological horror comic DOCTOR ORANGE. Living in suburban Mississippi with her wife and dog, Suhaila’s life is isolated but quiet, and her schizophrenia is generally controlled when she takes her medication. But after carving a jack o’lantern for Halloween – one she names Dr. Orange – she begins having dreams that the doctor – who takes on the persona of a psychotherapist – is coming after her. When she awakens, things aren’t as she left them.

Things go downhill from there. In 22 full-color pages in which nothing is a given, she doubts her senses. Viewing events through Suhaila’s eyes, you won’t know whether she’s hallucinating everything – and is, therefore, a threat to herself and others – or whether a jack o’lantern is really out to harm her and her loved ones. And after a while, you’ll begin to doubt your own senses, as well.

There are only four days until Halloween. What will happen when it arrives?

DOCTOR ORANGE (written, created, and lettered by Joseph Duis; line art by Jose Raul Orte Crespo; colors by Maulana Faris; with a cover by Greg Woronchak and Maulana Faris; and published by Heresy Studios, LLC) is available through Kickstarter on August 14th through September 7th at drorangecomic.com. In addition to the standard PDF and print copies, there are several other rewards, such as a deluxe edition, stickers, art prints, a Dr. Orange latex Halloween mask, and even being drawn into the comic as a psychiatric patient. So check it out today!


Joseph Duis
Owner-operator
Heresy Studios, LLC

This is their site https://www.heresystudiosllc.com/

Kick Starter page https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/2088467162/dr-orange-halloween-themed-psychological-horror-on?ref=513117&token=7aa65e3f

This looks amazing so get in now! I for one can not wait to see and read it!

 

 

Kathleen McCluskey (2018) Interview

I have been so lucky to meet so many great authors on Twitter and my next interview is another one of the greats. Kathleen McCluskey author of The Long Fall: Book 1: The Inception of Horror and The Long Fall : In The Midst Of Horror.

@KathleenMcClus4 Kathleen’s Twitter handle is also part of the amazing horror family just like my previous interview with @BlutengelDaemon . We are all great lovers of the genre and all of its aspects. It is my great pleasure to interview her, so lets get to the questions!

  1. Why the horror genre Kathleen?   ~I have always been drawn to stuff that would scare the shit out of me. I don’t know why. My mom and I used to watch Night Gallery and The Twilight Zone when I was a kid. Maybe that has something to do with it. I guess I just like the adrenaline associated with being scared. It’s quite the rush. When I was growing up my mom and dad ran a haunted house at a campground in July. I know, I know Halloween in July? Yep the kids got to trick or treat and then the haunted house for the adults. The locations were always creepy. They really did it fantastic. My father always played a Big Foot character and when I was old enough I played the dead crazy lady outside roaming around. So much fun. I’ve done haunted houses after that for a local amusement park. I do enjoy being scared and scaring people.
  2. When did you start writing?  ~ I wrote a story when I was about eight years old and it was called “The Monday Monster”. It basically was about a monster that lived under your bed. It would bite you on the ankle on Mondays and basically make them suck. LOL. I then wrote for my school newspaper. I wrote a short story once a month for it. It was always horror or thriller based. That was fun. After graduation I went to Penn State University and wrote for their paper once a week. It was articles about local bands. I didn’t last long, I had too much partying to do.
  3. Why the religious theme for your book?  ~ The religious theme for my books. Well, book one is the one with a lot of religion in it. But it also has battles with broad swords, hand to hand combat and an angel war. I wanted to write a vampire story. I wanted to make the main character the very first vampire. I needed to go back to the beginning. I thought about who it could be and came up with Satan’s son. Then I tried to figure out how he became who he became. I had to go all the way back to tell Satan’s story. THE LONG FALL series is about Lucifer. It’s also about his journey from being tossed out of heaven until the apocalypse. I intertwine the stories of Satan and his son. Book 2 is more about Satan’s son named William. Book 3, (soon to come out hopefully) continues with the anti-Christ and finally Book 4 is the apocalypse. They are all written but just the last two need editing.
  4. What are some of your favorite hobbies?  ~ Hobbies huh? Well, I am definitely not the knitting type. HAHAHA. I love to swim, I’m fortunate that my employment allows me to swim about thirty hours a week. I teach autistic and physically challenged children how to swim. On the weekends, when time allows I enjoy cooking and baking. Before it gets too hot here in the spring and summer I enjoy gardening. I put my headphones on with either something like Metallica or Zeppelin playing. I like to read and of course write. I have the type of brain that can’t sit still. I’m always doing something.
  5. What are some your favorite horror films and books?  ~ My all-time favorite horror movie is John Carpenter’s “Halloween”. It is so well done for the shoe string budget that he had. I adore the Michael Myers character. I think it gets a little silly after all the sequels but the first two done by Carpenter…..cinematic gold. I also like “30 Days Of Night”. The vampires in that film are so primitive and predatory. They are EXACTLY what a vampire should be. I loathe the “Twilight” bullshit. Newsflash: Vampires burst into flames in the sunlight. They DO NOT sparkle. LOLOLOLOLOLOL. I do enjoy some horror comedies like “Tucker and Dale VS Evil”. It all depends on my mood. My favorite author is Stephen King. I didn’t like the decade that he got sober and wrote a bunch of crap like “Dolores Claiborne” and “Rose Madder”. Don’t get me wrong I still read them and enjoyed them but they were just a bit preachy for me. He has made a comeback with the “Mr. Mercedes” series, though. I read other authors like Richard Laymon, Jack Ketchum, Anne rice and Dean Koontz to name a few.
  6. Tell our readers a little bit about you.  ~ I am the youngest of five children. I have two older brothers and two older sisters. My heritage is Irish, Czechoslovakian and a dash of American Indian (Apache). I have a Bachelor’s degree in psychology and an Associates degree in English. My children are 20 and 17. I have a daughter and a son. I was a platform diver in high school and college. I have lived an adrenaline filled life. I rode horses and motorcycles. I’ve been sky diving a million times. The Human Slingshot and Bungee Jumping are both things I’ve done but only once. I live in the city of bridges and when I was young we would jump off one of the bridges into the river. That’s crazy shit, I’m surprised I’m not dead.
  7. What would your perfect day be?  ~ Oh, my perfect day. I would love to get up and have eggs benedict waiting for me already made. Plus I didn’t have to clean up after it. Have a bloody Mary or two and get a full body massage. Then lounge around my house with my children and man. Just being together and eating and drinking, getting in the hot tub, swimming and laying in the sun. That evening have steaks on the grill and again not have to clean up. Then spend the night away sitting in front of the fire pit drinking a few cocktails and relaxing. Yep, I could use a day like that.
  8. Give us one of your funniest stories.  ~8. A funny story: When my kids were small I had them at a wave pool. They were in tubes and I had my arms, elbow deep into the holes that they were sitting in. Y’know to hold them so they didn’t float away from me. We were waiting for the waves to come on. I was a little hung over so needless to say my lower stomach had the rumbles.  I was what I call “crop dusting” in the pool. I was farting here, farting there. Nobody noticed because I was waist deep in the water. I let a long one out and wouldn’t you know it. Here comes a kid up behind me with goggles on and he screams at the top of his lungs, “I saw you faaawwwttttin’!!” I was horrified… and said, “get away from me kid.” He says it again, louder this time. I must have turned fifty different shades of red. All the people around us in the water were laughing. I wanted to die. I push them away from that mess. After my initial embarrassment went away I cracked up. Sweet Jesus he must have seen the bubbles coming from the bottom of my bathing suit. Every time I think about it I giggle.
  9. Do you have a personal mantra?  ~
    My personal mantra (I have 2) “Never have a battle of wits with an unarmed person.”
    “It is what it is”
    Here are the two links to Kathleen’s books so that you might enjoy them  https://www.amazon.com/Long-Fall-Book-Inception-Horror/dp/1947605038?keywords=kathleen+mccluskey&qid=1533792188&sr=8-2&ref=mp_s_a_1_2
    Book 1
    And https://www.amazon.com/LONG-FALL-Midst-Horror/dp/1983244139?keywords=kathleen+mccluskey&qid=1533792188&sr=8-1&ref=mp_s_a_1_1
    Book 2
    I have also included an excerpt for your reading pleasure!From: THE LONG FALL Book 1: The Inception Of Horror
    Chapter 14 “The Great Deception”

    He pushed Raphael away and staggered out of his tent, Raphael close behind him. He was there to hold up his lord if he was going to swoon; they could not afford to have Lucifer pass out in front of the troops. Blood dripped from Lucifer’s hands as he held his head. Raphael finally got to him, holding his brother up under the arm.
    “I don’t need your fucking help. Don’t fucking touch me.”
    Raphael didn’t listen; he helped his brother, lifting his head and the sight that met his eyes was truly fantastic. Raqael ran over and tried to release Raphael’s grip on Lucifer’s jaw. She again was denied by an unseen entity.
    Raphael, still holding his brother’s face, went to one knee and said, “My beautiful brother, you should see what I see.” He drew his broad sword and said, “Look for yourself, my brother.”
    Lucifer grabbed for the blade of the broad sword, no care of the slicing consequence of grabbing the divine, mighty instrument of war. He pulled the sword towards his face and could see for the first time the symbol of what he would be known for throughout time. Past, present and future generations would fear him even more. His lovely, gorgeous, wonderfully fantastic ram’s horns burst through his skull. Lucifer was shocked at the display before him and gave a boot to his brother Raphael in the middle of the chest.
    He called for Raqael and said, “This is finally my crown for my kingdom. I will be called Lord Lucifer from this moment on by all. Anyone who defies this order will be promptly beheaded. Behold my kingdom and my queen.”

I want to thank Kathleen McCluskey for her kindness in taking the time to talk with us and give us some insight into her process and life!

 

In the name of Perdition and her warrior Damnation

Cursed be thy name

Your kingdom all encompassing

Also ever lasting, your will never questioned

To avoid persecution and condemnation

Though benevolent you say you are

We are left playing in your strange bazaar

You created the mortals, and The Arcane

And put them on a chess board

For your own little game

A game where the majority loses so that

No one may reign

Soulless or hellfire is what is left to us

Damnation The Arcanes only threat

The only thing they fear, certainly not us

So as we quiver in fear in our locked rooms

Knowing your wrath and waiting our eventual doom

We pray please be kind and dont take our souls

But we know you dont hear us not even the death toll

Poem 8/10/18

Angel Daemon (2018) Interview

My first interview is with someone I have wanted to chronicle for a long time, the infamous Angel Daemon or @Blutengeldaemon my good friend and part of the #horror family on Twitter.

As the Encyclopaedia Britannica states : Angel and demon, demon also spelled daemon, respectively, any benevolent or malevolent spiritual being that mediates between transcendent and temporal realms. And that is how I feel about his writing,  he is so in touch with his feelings and inner mind that they are a consummate example of what writing is supposed to be. Therapeutic, intriguing, thought provoking and yes, spiritual. Not in a religious sense but in a metaphysical one. On that note lets get to the questions:

  1. Why do you write Angel? ~ Writing has become an escape. It’s a way to vent all my anger, hate, sadness and even happiness into the characters I created. So, it’s not so much me escaping, it’s the negativity that’s escaping onto the page and into the stories. It’s free therapy.
  2. Why the horror genre? ~ I love all genres. Growing up I watched a lot of cartoons like most kids. But my first form of entertainment was Horror. I just loved it. Before I was 6, I had already watched 2 ‘Friday the 13th’ movies, 3 ‘Nightmare on Elm Street’ movies, ‘Evil Dead 2’, ‘House’, and ‘Fright Night’. It’s just something that I can’t really explain. The way some people love comic books, Star Wars or Star Trek, I love Horror.
  3. When did you start writing and what made you get into it? ~ Since I was a kid, I always loved to create works of fiction. Whether it was using figures, toys or writing. I implemented that into school work(elementary) when we had to write stories. Teacher would tell us to write a page and I’d write 10. Every time I watched a movie, horror or not, I’d get my brother’s G.I Joes and “remake” the movie I just saw. I created my own ‘Friday the 13th’ movies. I took Jason to Disney, Hollywood, the wild west and who knows where else. Even as a drug addicted teenager, I was creating stuff in my head with no idea how to display it. In the end, I got tired of saying that they should make a movie like this or that. That little voice in my head said, “Why don’t you do it?” That was the spark I needed.
  4. Who are some of your favorite authors or what about some of your favorite books? ~ I really don’t read that much. Growing up I read a lot of kids’ books. As a teen I read most wrestler’s autobiographies. As I got older, I became a huge fan of Edgar Allen Poe and his work. My favorite of his is Metzengerstein. It’s actually his first short story. Currently, I’m reading a lot of Ralph Waldo Emerson. Of course, the Brothers Grimm are excellent as well so I’d say them too.
  5. What is something you would like people to knw about you? ~ I always tell people that I may write dark content and have a morbid imagination…but it’s only my sense of humor that is dark and twisted…not my heart.
  6. Do you have a personal mantra? ~ I use 2 actually. First one, belongs to wrestler Rowdy Roddy Piper. I use this when writing to keep me motivated creatively. It goes: “Just when you think you have all the answers, I change the questions.” The other plays off of the “Methods to your Madness” phrase. It is there are Madness to my Methods. Using the former, it can be predictable in a lot of cases. Like a familiar madness. Madness to my methods sort of leaves it up in the air as to what am I going to do next?

This is a link to his WATT PAD page where you can read all of his amazing other works!

https://www.wattpad.com/user/AngelDaemon17

me3.JPG

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑